Here’s what part two of Phase 2 will look like in Massachusetts

Here's what part two of Phase 2 will look like in Massachusetts

BOSTON — The second part of Massachusetts’ Phase 2 of reopening will begin Monday, June 22, which will include indoor dining and increased office capacity.

Governor Charlie Baker’s Phase 2 of the state’s reopening process officially began on Monday, June 8.

“Reopening Massachusetts is working,” he said.

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Baker encouraged offices to continue to allow telecommuting and minimized in-office staff. He said he wants Massachusetts to continue to “bring the fight to the virus” while reopening the economy.

“The tremendous progress we’ve made proves that these things do work and we can contain the virus,” he said.

He added that Mass. residents should not get complacent. “It only works when everybody does their job to slow the spread,” Baker said.

He said almost 16,000 people have been tested at the pop-up sites for those who turned out to demonstrations in honor of George Floyd. The state is still awaiting the full results.

Part 2 Phase 2 set to start on Monday, June 22

The Baker administration previously published details of Phase 2, which includes the return of youth sports practices, child care, day camps, warehouses and distribution centers, and higher education courses required for graduating, lodging, routine medical exams, and return of retail sales with restrictions.


Here’s the Phase 2 - Step 2 report from the state:

The following will be eligible to reopen in Step Two of Phase II on Monday, June 22:

  • Indoor table service at restaurants;
  • Close-contact personal services, with restrictions;
  • Retail dressing rooms, by appointment only;
  • Offices, at 50 percent capacity

Full list and safety protocols available at www.mass.gov/reopening.

In order to give Step 2 businesses time to prepare, the Administration had previously released sector-specific guidance in advance of Phase II for industries including restaurants, close-contact personal services and sectors not otherwise addressed:

Before these sectors can resume operations under the guidelines, businesses must meet all safety standards, create a COVID-19 control plan, and complete a self-certification.

Each phase takes as little as three weeks but if health data reveals a spike in key metrics, the state would put its reopening in reverse.

Phase 3 could begin as early as June 29th, but Baker said Friday he wants at least two weeks of data from indoor dining before we move to Phase 3, pushing that to early July.

Restaurants are getting ready to reopen to indoor dining, with social distancing restrictions.

“To be honest with you it’s an enormous project but I think the excitement we have to be getting back into business is really going to be, it’s going to seem like nothing at the end of the day,” said Charlie Wright, General Manager on his staff helping get things ready in very short order to reopen.

Others are just hoping people show up.

“The people that we rely on are not around. You can open the doors 24 hours a day you still need people to come in and eat and drink,” said Oran McGonagle, director of operations East Coast Tavern Group (Emmet’s, Magnolia Smokehouse, Sunset Cantina).

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