• Police issue warning after ice & snow crash through windshields in Mass. & NH

    By: Mike Saccone , Jessica Reyes

    Updated:

    The message from police departments across New England is the same: clear the snow before you go

    State Police troopers say they've responded to several crashes caused by snow and ice flying off cars over the past few days.

    Temperatures began to climb mid-week after the season's first major winter storm that brought snow and ice to the area. The above-freezing temperatures will cause piles of snow and ice left on vehicles to become loose. If they’re not removed before the vehicles hit the road, they pose a serious danger. 

    Massachusetts State Police Trooper Dustin Fitch warned on Twitter, “It’s going to warm up the next couple days and those snow/ice missiles will be firing off of vehicles.”

    Fitch included a photo of a snow-covered pick-up truck a trooper stopped Tuesday on I-95 in Foxboro.

    “Please remember to think about your safety and the safety of those around you,” Massachusetts State Police said. 

    Boston 25 News reporter Jessica Reyes rode along with State Police trooper Joe Hall, who works with the State Police community action team out of Holden, on Wendesday and watched as he issued warnings to several drivers with dangerous amounts of snow on their roofs.

    State Police also responded to a call on 495 South in Boxboro after chunks of ice flew off a tractor and smashed a car's windshield. The driver says the ice hit her so hard she was afraid it was going to break her windshield open.

    "They were giant pieces of ice, so I thought they were gonna come through and I was gonna get hit with ice," said Laura Rund.

    Rund managed to take a picture of the tractor trailer, but had to pull over and call for help.

    "I was scared, I was hoping I could pull over because I was in the left lane, there were tons of traffic, how can I get off the road? Is my windshield gonna smash?" said Rund. 

    The state trooper who helped Rund said she pulled over just as he was finishing taking a report from another driver with the exact same issue.

    As for the drivers Trooper Hall pulled over on Wednesday, they were all let go with warnings. Trooper Hall says the iea really isn't to get anyone in trouble, but rather to get a simple message across.

    "Clear the snow before you go," said Trooper Hall.

    Auburn Police Chief Andrew Sluckis reported a similar situation in his town. He shared a photo of a smashed windshield and said a chunk of ice flew off a pick-up truck Tuesday on Route 20 and hit a woman’s car. The driver of the truck kept going, but a witness wrote down the license plate number. Police issued the woman behind the wheel of the truck a $200 fine. She told police she had no idea the ice flew off her truck. 

    New Hampshire State Police reported a vehicle failed to remove the snow and ice from their roof, which struck a school bus Tuesday evening on I-93 South in Campton. Several students were on board the bus, but no one was hurt. 

    Since 2002, Drivers in New Hampshire have been legally required to clear snow and ice off their cars before getting on the road. Jessica's Law was passed after Jessica Smith was killed when ice from a tractor-trailer ended up hitting her car. Drivers who violate the law face fines of at least $250 for a first offense. 

    Also, a man driving home from work on Route 24 South in Bridgewater Tuesday night narrowly escaped injury when a large chunk of ice came off an SUV and smashed his windshield. His car had to be towed from the highway.

    The snow on the roof of your car might look harmless at first, but if left untouched, it'll harden and turn into a block of ice. You can face a fine of up to $200 if police pull you over for failing to clear the snow off your car.

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