Impeachment Trial Day 8: What time does it start, how to watch, what to expect

Impeachment trail day 8: What to expect

President Donald Trump’s defense team completed its presentation Tuesday, urging senators to end the process and acquit the president.

The trial moves to the next phase on Wednesday when senators are allowed to question the presentations offered by both sides.

Here is how you can watch the proceedings on television and online:

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What time does it start: The Senate will reconvene at 1 p.m. Wednesday and the trial will continue then.

How can you watch: The trial will be live on cable news networks like CNN, Fox and MSNBC as well as CSPAN-2. It will also be broadcast live on ABC, CBS, NBC and PBS.

You can catch coverage on the networks’ online sites by going to the homepage for each network and finding a link to live coverage.

The networks also have YouTube channels where the livestream of their coverage of the trial can be accessed. Most local television and newspaper sites will also have livestreams on their websites. Go to the TV or newspaper homesite and look for a link.

What to expect next: The trial has adjourned for the day and will reconvene Wednesday at 1 p.m. ET. When the trial resumes, senators will be allowed to ask questions of the House managers and the president’s attorneys.

The questions will be submitted to U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, who will read the questions.

There will be two days of questioning then a vote will likely come on Friday as to whether or not to call witnesses in the trial or move on to a vote on whether the president should be removed from office.

In this image from video, personal attorney to President Donald Trump, Jay Sekulow, speaks during the impeachment trial against Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020.
In this image from video, personal attorney to President Donald Trump, Jay Sekulow, speaks during the impeachment trial against Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. (Senate Television via AP/AP)