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Monica Cannon-Grant and her husband plead ‘not guilty’ to federal fraud charges

BOSTON — The widespread federal fraud case against “Violence in Boston” founder Monica Cannon-Grant and her husband Clark Grant returned to federal court on Tuesday as the pair faced arraignment.

Cannon-Grant and her husband are accused of steering money meant for their nonprofit organization to themselves.

Both pleaded not guilty to charges that include conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy, and making false statements to a mortgage lending business.

“The indictment alleges that the defendants conspired to use VIB as a vehicle to solicit and receive charitable contributions from institutional and individual donors that they then used for a wide range of personal expenses and to enrich themselves while concealing such expenditures from VIB directors, officers and others,” according to the US Attorney’s office.

“Specifically, from 2017 through at least 2020, it is alleged that Cannon-Grant and Grant exercised exclusive control over VIB financial accounts and diverted VIB money to themselves through cash withdrawals, cashed checks, debit purchases and transfers to their personal bank accounts,” according to the statement.

During their arraignment on Tuesday, the prosecutor discussed the “massive amount of discovery,” while asking the judge to designate the prosecution a “complex case,” which could slow the production of discovery. Attorneys for Cannon-Grant and her husband both questioned the need for that designation.

The judge agreed to allow for the Initial production of evidence in the case by April 26th.

The indictment alleges Cannon-Grant and Clark Grant solicited and received more than $1 million in donations and grants from individuals, charitable institutions and other entities between 2017 - 2021.

Prosecutors also laid out potential penalties in the 18-count indictment in court on Tuesday.

The charges of wire fraud conspiracy each provide for a sentence of up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000.

The charge of conspiracy provides for a sentence of up to five years in prison and a fine of $250,000.

The charges of wire fraud each provide for a sentence of up to 20 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000.

The charge of making false statements to a mortgage lending business provides for a sentence of up to 30 years in prison and a fine of up to $1 million.

The case returns to court on May 23. The judge told Cannon-Grant and her husband that neither needed to be present for that status conference hearing.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates as more information becomes available.

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