Ipswich organization fighting for refugee children in desperate need of medical help

Ipswich organization fighting for refugee children in desperate need of medical help

IPSWICH, Mass. — A North Shore organization helping wounded refugee children is seeing tragic impacts of U.S. President Donald Trump’s immigration ban first hand -- in children who are here for life-saving medical treatment.

The organizers of Ipswich-based House of Peace are worried these children won't be able to get back into the U.S. for follow-up care.

FOX25 first spoke to the family of 1-year-old baby Dilbreen last fall when he flew into Boston's Logan Airport.

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His refugee camp in northern Iraq was attacked by ISIS and Dilbreen suffered severe burns -- affecting his eyesight.

He's now being treated at Shriner's Hospital in Boston.

He’ll have to have plastic surgery for up to a year to restore his nose and he's going blind because of a fracture, so it's vital.

But Dilbreen's parents remain in Iraq because his mother just gave birth to another baby.

The founders of House of Peace, John and Carrie Schuchardt will soon host baby Dilbreen at their home and taking care of him.

His parents desperately want to come see their son, but Dilbreen's father's visa was just revoked.

After Trump's executive order banning travel from several Muslim-majority countries, including
Iraq, for 90 days and suspending refugee admission for 120 days.

The likelihood of Dilbreen's parents being able to come here seems slim to none, so the hope is to reunite baby Dilbreen with his family in Iraq, but bring him back to Boston periodically for follow-up care.

But they’re also concerned it will be difficult to make that happen in this political climate.

It's not just little Dilbreen, the Schuchardts are also working with three little girls from Iraq and Syria who will need to come back in the coming months for follow-up care for their war injuries; there’s also a 2-year-old from Iraq with leukemia who is receiving treatment at mass general.

Many groups like The House of Peace are now wondering how they'll continue their missions if they aren't able to get children and families in and out of the country.

The House of Peace is consulting with their immigration lawyers and colleagues to try to find a way.